Health Immigration Surcharge

The British Government introduced the health immigration surcharge on 6 April 2015.

The UK Government introduced the Immigration Health Surcharge, as they wanted to make sure that non-EEA nationals make an appropriate financial contribution to the cost of making use of the National Health Service (NHS).

Who has to pay the Health Immigration Surcharge?

All non-EEA nationals who apply for a UK visa for a period longer than six months have to pay the UK health surcharge.

Dependents who apply, also have to pay the surcharge.

What is the cost of the Health Immigration Surcharge?

Students and applicants for the Youth Mobility Scheme pay £300 per person per year. All other applicants pay £400 per person per year.

When you apply for a visa, you have to pay to cover the whole period of stay for each application.  For example; if you apply for a UK Ancestry Visa for five years, you will have to pay £400 x 5 years = £2,000.

Visitors and Health Immigration Surcharge

Visitor visas are exempt from the surcharge. Persons who apply for a visitor visa to the UK, thus do not have to pay this health immigration surcharge.

ILR and British Citizenship applications

Persons who apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) or British citizenship do not have to pay the health  immigration surcharge.

Other Exemptions on the Health Immigration Surcharge

Dependents of a member of Her Majesty’s Forces do not have to pay the surcharge. Persons who apply under the Home Office concession known as the ‘destitute domestic violence concession’ are also excluded.

Please contact your BIC consultant for more information about other exemptions.

Practical implications

When you make a UK Visa application, you have to include the proof of payment of the surcharge. The amount that you need to pay, must cover the total period for the UK visa you apply for.

The payment is mandatory, and collected as part of the immigration application.

If your UK visa application is unsuccessful, you will receive a refund.